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Shore Scene: Starring in the Tidepools

By Mia Davidson and Jan Sattler   Due to its bright coloring and star shape, the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus) is one of the most beloved animals regularly seen along the Laguna coast. They live in ocean water of up to 300 feet deep but because they are tolerant of air...

Shore Scene: Observing Opaleye

By Mia Davidson and Jan Sattler Since January 2012, fishing in much of Laguna Beach is prohibited by law.  Prior to that, one fish popular with anglers was the opaleye (Girella nigricans).  The fish has dark olive-green backs and light undersides.  Opaleye can be easily...

Shore Scene: Shrinkage in Nature’s Sieve

By Jan Sattler and Mia Davidson California Mussels (Mytilus californianus) are the most commonly found empty shell and are the most visible mollusks observed along Laguna Beach’s shore.  The bivalves have bluish-black shells and orange colored flesh. They take three years to...

Foundation Hosts Lecturer, Lecture

  Laguna Ocean Foundation will host the talk “Rocky Intertidal Ecology and Effects of Urbanization” presented by Dr. Jayson Smith at Laguna Art Museum on Thursday, Sept. 27. Smith’s talk will focus on Laguna Beach’s rocky coastline ecosystems. In addition, he will share...

Explaining a Phenomenon

Editor, I read with interest your Aug. 31 article “Ocean Critters in Hot Water.”  I applaud the hard work that Laguna Ocean Foundation has been doing to educate people and protect our vital coastline.  In addition, with the hot weather, I too have been enjoying the heavenly warm...

Correction 9/7

Correction: The Aug. 31 article “Ocean Critters in Hot Water” incorrectly cited the name of an organization, correctly known as the Laguna Ocean Foundation.   Since publication of “Seasoning Football With Fresh Fare” in the Aug. 31 edition, school administrators...

New Rules Dim Night Lighting

The city’s first outdoor-lighting ordinance that calls on neighbors to cooperate before complaining to police about glaring night lights was given the green light by the City Council Tuesday night. In a 3-2 vote, the council favored keeping lights low and shielded to avoid “light...

Shorebirds Losing Footing Along Coastline

Floodlights and people taking over wildlife habitat Shorebirds are getting edged out of their habitat by humans along Laguna’s coastline, according to an on-going study by the Laguna Ocean Foundation. Ed Almanza, foundation vice-chairman and a geographer interested in...

Catchy But Inaccurate

Editor, Your headline caption in the May 27 issue, “Volunteer Tidepool Cops Wanted,” is catchy, but misleading and incorrect.   The wonderful members of the Laguna Ocean Foundation tidepool docent program are not “cops.”  The tidepool docents are caring...

“No Take” Is a Gift to Laguna

Editor, Protection of our new marine reserves and enforcement of the Fish and Game regulations will be easier than people might think. Already, many of our residents are aware of the importance of restoring our marine habitats. Likewise, tourists to Laguna share a desire to see...